Tag Archives: science

How We Know What We Know 2: Occam’s Razor

(Continues from part one) So far we’ve examined how we form a scientific theory. What we need to know now is what makes a *good* theory – how do we choose between two theories which make the same predictions? The … Continue reading

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How We Know What We Know: 1 – Feedback

One of the reasons I’ve started this series of posts is because I have a huge respect for the scientific method – in fact, I’d go so far as to say that I think the scientific method is the only … Continue reading

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How We Know What We Know: Introduction

I’ve been reading up a lot over the last few years about a large variety of subjects, not science as such but how we do science and how we actually know what we know. I’ve written about some of these … Continue reading

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The Grandfather Paradox: Experimentally Resolved?

A revised and improved version of this essay is in my book Sci-Ence! Justice Leak! – hardback, paperback, PDF Kindle (US), Kindle (UK), all other ebook formats I am utterly astounded that I’d never seen this before today – an … Continue reading

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Bullet-Biters And Bomb-Testers

Sometimes serendipity happens. I was trying to think of a way to link together a couple of sections of the Hyperpost book, when I found this old post from Scott Aaronson’s blog Shtetl-Optimised. In it, Aaronson talks about how he’d … Continue reading

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Geeks Dig Metaphors: Paradigm A Dozen

All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy, all work and no play makes Jack a dull boy, all work… This series of posts has become rather longer than the very short thing I was originally going to … Continue reading

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Geeks Dig Metaphors: The Technical Problems With The Singularity

Back to introduction I have come to the conclusion that anyone who talks about how easy it’s going to be to simulate a human brain in a computer either understands computers but doesn’t understand biology, or doesn’t understand computers but … Continue reading

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